Skip to main content

IS A HIGHLY EFFECTIVE EDUCATIONAL APPROACH THAT ENCOURAGES ACTIVE PARTICIPATION AND DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF A SUBJECT MATTER. THIS METHOD LEVERAGES THE POWER OF EXPLAINING CONCEPTS TO OTHERS TO ENHANCE KNOWLEDGE RETENTION, REFINE TEACHING SKILLS, AND PROMOTE ACTIVE LEARNING.

Image credit - [Stocksnap](https://pixabay.com/photos/girls-sisters-kids-children-2564803/)
Image credit - Stocksnap
  1. POSTS/

๐Ÿ‘ฏ EMPOWERING LEARNERS - LEARNING BY TEACHING

๐Ÿ—‚๏ธ Representation ๐Ÿ“ Learning ๐Ÿท๏ธ Tools Metaphors
๐Ÿ•™ 22 mins
Table of Contents
Representation - This article is part of a series.
Part : This Article

“The best way to learn something is to teach it to someone else.” - Unknown

๐Ÿ“„ ABSTRACT OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

Learning by teaching, also known as peer tutoring or reciprocal teaching, is a pedagogical approach that involves students actively explaining concepts to others. This method is effective in enhancing knowledge retention, deepening understanding, and developing teaching skills.

The benefits of learning by teaching can be attributed to the self-explanation process that occurs when individuals explain concepts to others. This process requires learners to organize, articulate, and simplify their understanding of the material, which promotes deeper comprehension and strengthens memory retention. Additionally, teaching someone else requires a deeper level of understanding than simply knowing the material for oneself, as it necessitates identifying areas of incomplete knowledge and seeking further clarification.

Learning by teaching also fosters effective communication and presentation skills. As individuals engage in teaching, they gain experience in tailoring explanations to different learning styles, using various teaching methods, and simplifying complex concepts. This active engagement with the material promotes active learning, where learners process and apply information rather than passively absorbing it.

To effectively implement learning by teaching, several strategies can be employed. Selecting relevant topics that align with personal interests and expertise can enhance motivation and ensure accurate explanations. Identifying the target audience and adapting explanations accordingly is crucial for effective communication. Utilizing a variety of teaching methods, including visual aids, hands-on activities, and interactive discussions, caters to different learning preferences. Seeking feedback and iterating on explanations and teaching approaches based on feedback is essential for continuous improvement. Expanding beyond traditional classroom settings, such as developing online tutorials, writing blog posts, or producing video lessons, further expands the reach of knowledge sharing.

Examples of learning by teaching in practice include volunteering as a tutor or mentor, creating online courses or lessons, contributing to open educational resources, designing educational content for specific platforms, and collaborating with peers on teaching projects.

THE BENEFITS OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

“The more you teach, the more you learn.” - Seneca

  1. Enhanced Knowledge Retention: When individuals explain concepts to others, they are forced to organize and articulate their understanding clearly and concisely. This process strengthens their grasp of the subject matter and makes it more likely to stick in their long-term memory.

  2. Deeper Understanding: Teaching someone else requires a deeper level of comprehension than simply knowing the material for oneself. By explaining concepts to others, learners identify areas where their understanding is still lacking, prompting them to seek further clarification or revisit relevant materials.

  3. Improved Teaching Skills: Effectively explaining complex topics to others hones one’s communication and presentation skills. Learners gain experience in simplifying complex ideas, tailoring explanations to different learners, and using various teaching methods to engage their audience.

  4. Promotes Active Learning: Generating content through teaching encourages active participation and hands-on engagement with the subject matter. This approach contrasts with passive learning, where students simply consume information without actively processing and applying it.

๐Ÿ›๏ธ ORIGINS AND PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

The concept of learning by teaching, also known as reciprocal teaching or peer tutoring, has a long and rich history dating back to ancient times. It has been observed in various educational settings and cultures, suggesting that it is a natural and effective way for people to learn and share knowledge.

Asian Culture:

Learning by teaching has a long and rich history in Asian culture, deeply embedded in various educational traditions. This approach finds expression in the Confucian concept of “Shu”, which emphasizes the importance of imitation and emulation of role models. In traditional Confucian schools, students would learn by observing and assisting their teachers, gradually absorbing their knowledge and skills.

Another notable example is the “Hakwon” system of education prevalent in Korea, where older students serve as “Hakwon Masters”, providing guidance and instruction to younger students. This mentorship system fosters a culture of mutual learning and active participation, where students actively apply their knowledge and share their understanding with others.

Hispanic Culture:

The concept of “Compadrazgo”, or “Co-Parenthood”, in Hispanic cultures exemplifies the spirit of learning by teaching. This social practice involves close relationships between families, where individuals act as “Compadres” or “Comadres”, serving as mentors and role models for each other’s children. This reciprocal exchange of knowledge and support fosters a communal learning environment where children learn from their peers and adults alike.

The tradition of “Jarabe Tapatรญo”, a Mexican dance, also embodies the concept of learning by teaching. During the dance, experienced dancers teach novices the intricate steps and footwork, encouraging active participation and mutual learning. This emphasis on group dynamics and collective knowledge reflects the collaborative nature of learning in Hispanic cultures.

Ancient Greece and Rome:

Learning by teaching was prevalent in ancient Greek and Roman societies, where apprenticeships and mentoring were common educational practices. Under these systems, novices would learn by observing and assisting more experienced individuals, such as artisans, craftsmen, and scholars. This reciprocal process of knowledge transfer fostered a culture of learning by doing and collaborative learning.

Ancient India:

In ancient India, the Gurukul system of education emphasized the importance of “Sishya Guru Bhaava”, which translates to “the relationship between a student and a teacher is like that of a child and a parent.” This concept fostered a deep bond between teachers and students, encouraging active participation, mutual respect, and lifelong learning.

Traditional African Societies:

In many traditional African societies, learning by teaching was embedded in the “Ubuntu” philosophy, which emphasizes the interconnectedness of individuals and the importance of sharing knowledge and skills for the collective good. This philosophy is reflected in the practice of “Orature”, or storytelling, where elders would share their wisdom and knowledge with younger generations, promoting cultural continuity and collective learning.

The “Call and Response” tradition in African-American music and storytelling further embodies the essence of learning by teaching. It involves a dynamic exchange between the speaker and the audience, where the speaker poses a question or thought, and the audience responds with a chorus or affirmation. This interactive approach encourages active participation, promotes critical thinking, and deepens understanding.

Middle Eastern Culture:

The “Maqasid al-Shari’ah”, or “objectives of Islamic law,” emphasizes the importance of “Ilm” (knowledge) and “Tasallum” (learning), recognizing them as essential pillars of personal and societal development. This emphasis on learning has led to various pedagogical practices that incorporate learning by teaching, such as “Halaqas” (study circles) and “Madrasas” (religious schools).

Indigenous Cultures:

Many indigenous cultures around the world have developed unique traditions of learning by teaching, incorporating storytelling, observation, and hands-on learning experiences. These practices foster a deep connection to the natural world and a respect for traditional knowledge.

Examples:

The “Talking Circle” tradition in Native American communities: Participants share their thoughts and insights in a circle, ensuring that everyone has a chance to contribute and learn from others.

The “Kiva” system of education among Puebloan people: Young apprentices would learn from experienced elders in the kiva, a sacred subterranean chamber, exchanging knowledge and wisdom.

The “Mentorship” system among the Maasai people: Young warriors would learn from experienced elders, observing their skills and practices, and gradually gaining mastery over their roles within the community.

Renaissance and Early Modern Eras:

The Renaissance and Early Modern periods saw a flourishing of educational reforms, including the development of new teaching methods that emphasized active learning and peer interaction. Educators like Comenius and Locke advocated for hands-on learning and the exchange of ideas among students, recognizing the benefits of learning by teaching.

19th Century:

The 19th century saw the rise of monitorial schools, where older students were trained to teach younger ones. This system, based on the principles of reciprocal teaching, aimed to improve educational access and efficiency.

Modern Era:

In the 20th and 21st centuries, the concept of learning by teaching has continued to evolve and gain recognition as a powerful pedagogical approach. The development of cooperative learning techniques, peer tutoring programs, and online learning platforms has provided new avenues for learners to engage in reciprocal teaching and enhance their understanding of various subjects.

Current Applications:

Today, learning by teaching is widely used in educational settings, from traditional classrooms to online learning platforms. It is employed in various subjects, including mathematics, science, language arts, and social studies. The method has also been adapted for use in professional development programs and organizations to promote knowledge sharing and skill development.

PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

  1. Active Participation:

Learning by teaching encourages active participation from both the teacher and the learner. The teacher is not simply imparting information but rather guiding the learner through the process of explaining and applying concepts. This active engagement promotes deeper understanding and retention of knowledge.

  1. Self-Explanation:

The act of explaining concepts to others forces the learner to organize, articulate, and simplify their understanding. This self-explanation process helps solidify knowledge and make it more accessible for retrieval.

  1. Reciprocal Teaching:

Learning by teaching is often implemented in a reciprocal teaching format, where students take turns teaching and learning from each other. This dynamic exchange of knowledge fosters a collaborative learning environment and promotes deeper understanding from multiple perspectives.

  1. Error Correction and Feedback:

Learning by teaching provides opportunities for error correction and feedback. When learners explain concepts and receive feedback, they can identify areas of misunderstanding and refine their explanations. This process of self-reflection and revision enhances knowledge acquisition.

  1. Metacognition:

Learning by teaching encourages metacognitive processes, such as self-monitoring, self-evaluation, and strategy selection. As learners explain concepts, they reflect on their understanding and identify effective teaching strategies. This metacognitive awareness improves learning outcomes.

  1. Motivation and Engagement:

Learning by teaching can be a highly motivating and engaging learning experience. Learners enjoy the opportunity to share their knowledge, receive feedback, and see their peers learn from their explanations. This sense of accomplishment and responsibility fosters deeper engagement and motivation.

  1. Transfer of Learning:

Learning by teaching promotes the transfer of knowledge to different contexts and situations. As learners explain concepts to others, they are forced to apply their understanding in new ways, strengthening their ability to generalize and apply knowledge to real-world problems.

  1. Development of Teaching Skills:

Learning by teaching provides opportunities to develop teaching skills, such as presentation, communication, and active learning strategies. By teaching others, learners gain firsthand experience in explaining concepts clearly, managing group dynamics, and adapting teaching approaches to different learners.

๐Ÿ—จ๏ธ GUIDING PARTICIPANTS IN LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

  • Sitting by side so you can perceive nuances in facial expression, gestures, and coloration of the skin and not stay in the way of a client who is accessing their images and creating metaphors in front of them.

  • Modulate your voice and speak slowly and melodically.

  • Be interested in client exploration.

  • Repeat the client’s words using his voice delivery. For instance, when the client spoke about an exciting event, his face lightened up, his words speeded up and his tone of voice was higher. As a professional, you are, to match his expression or attend acting class to learn essentials.

  • Connect the question and experience with coordinating conjunction and/as/when.

๐Ÿ’ง LEARNING BY TEACHING SCRIPT BASED ON EXPLORATION OF VLADIMIR KLIMSA
#

“Learning by teaching is like lighting a fire. You don’t just get to see the light, you feel the warmth as well.” - Unknown

Vlad: “Hello, What can I do for you today?”

Client: “I would like to learn HTML faster than I normally do as I need to build my site.”

Vlad: “When and where you have enjoyed learning anything faster than you normally do?”

Client: “I went to Mexico and spent time in a tiny village. I learned to express myself in Spanish much faster than I did with my French after 3 years of study while laughing and enjoying myself.”

Vlad: “You were surrounded by people, and culture and needed to learn to communicate, eat, drink, and live. Can you think about two or more situations where you have learned anything faster than you normally do?”

Client: “I accompanied a friend to a cooking class and somehow it all started to flow. I was amazed at what we accomplished in a matter of fraction of time. I needed to learn PowerPoint to teach essential steps about using PowerPoint and I realized that preparing myself to teach was different in terms of gathering, organizing, evaluating, and constructing the presentation.”

Vlad: “If you allow me I present here Core transformation as a tool to align your desire and after that, we do the change.”

Client: “That’s fine by me.”

Core transformation process

Client: “Something had changed. I can feel that I am capable.”

Vlad: “That’s great. Can we review what is this feeling associated with?”

Client: "

  • I will look up friends, and people who know HTML, read and watch tutorials, and have a good time expanding my knowledge.
  • I will search for HTML templates that are similar to what I want to accomplish and use them for playing and learning.
  • I will build at least 3 demos and choose the best one.
  • I will invite the friends, review the code, correct the mistakes, and have a good time."

Vlad: “That seems a good plan.”

Client: “Thanks very much.”

Vlad: “You are welcome.”

๐Ÿ‘ฃ THE BASIC PROCESS LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

The basic process of learning by teaching involves a cyclical approach that encourages active participation, self-explanation, reciprocal teaching, error correction, and metacognition. Here’s a breakdown of the process:

  1. Choose a Topic: Select a subject or concept that you want to learn or improve your understanding of. Ensure the topic is relevant to your interests and expertise.

  2. Identify the Learning Objectives: Clearly define what you aim to achieve through learning by teaching. What specific skills or knowledge do you want to gain from explaining the topic to others?

  3. Develop Teaching Materials: Gather or create materials that will aid in your explanations and demonstrations. This may include notes, diagrams, examples, or visual aids.

  4. Explain the Concept: Start by explaining the concept to yourself, organizing and simplifying the material for better understanding. This self-explanation process is crucial for solidifying knowledge.

  5. Teach the Concept to Others: Seek out individuals or groups willing to learn from your explanation. Share your knowledge with enthusiasm, incorporating your teaching materials and adapting your explanations to their learning styles.

  6. Receive Feedback and Refine Explanations: As you teach, actively seek feedback from your learners. Identify areas where your explanations need clarification or improvement.

  7. Repeat the Cycle: Engage in multiple rounds of teaching and feedback. Each cycle will deepen your understanding and enhance your teaching skills.

  8. Extend Learning: Apply your knowledge to real-world situations, demonstrating your understanding in practical contexts.

  9. Share Learning Resources: Create or share educational materials that can benefit others, extending the impact of your learning and teaching experiences.

๐Ÿ’ช MEDITATION OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

  • Find a comfortable position to sit or lie down in. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths. Relax your body and mind.

  • Imagine that you are in a safe and peaceful place. This could be a real place that you know, or it could be an imaginary place.

  • Once you feel relaxed and grounded, bring your attention to what you want to learn and play with. Think about the friends, people in your life, or masters who know the subject you want to learn.

  • Think that you will teach the subject to others in an enjoyable way and remember the times you were presenting effortlessly or flowing in knowing that all is good. Learning is experimenting and PLAYING.

  • Put nice music and start by gathering or creating materials that will aid in your explanations and demonstrations.

  • Follow up by explaining the concept to yourself, organizing and simplifying the material for better understanding.

  • Imagine that you are sharing your knowledge with others with enthusiasm, incorporating your teaching materials and adapting your explanations to their learning styles.

  • Imagine actively seeking feedback from your learners. Identify areas where your explanations need clarification or improvement.

  • Repeat the cycle. Engage in multiple rounds of teaching and feedback, noticing the growth as a person, your communication skills

  • Extend Learning. Apply your knowledge to real-world situations, demonstrating your understanding in practical contexts.

  • Share Learning Resources. Create or share educational materials that can benefit others, extending the impact of your learning and teaching experiences.

โ–ถ๏ธ VIDEO OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

โ–ถ๏ธ Youtube - The protรฉgรฉ effect: Learning by teaching!

โ” FAQ OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

Q: What is learning by teaching?

A: Learning by teaching is a pedagogical approach where learners actively explain concepts to others to solidify their understanding. This process of self-explanation and reciprocal teaching enhances knowledge retention, deepens comprehension, and develops teaching skills.

Q: How does learning by teaching work?

A: Learning by teaching involves a cyclical process that encourages active participation, self-explanation, reciprocal teaching, error correction, and metacognition. Learners start by choosing a topic of interest, identifying learning objectives, and developing teaching materials. They then explain the concept to themselves, share their knowledge with others, receive feedback, refine their explanations, and repeat the cycle multiple times.

Q: What are the benefits of learning by teaching?

A: Learning by teaching offers numerous benefits, including:

  • Enhanced knowledge retention and deeper understanding: Explaining concepts forces learners to organize, simplify, and articulate their knowledge, leading to improved comprehension and long-term memory.

  • Improved teaching skills: Engaged in the process of explaining and teaching, learners develop effective communication, presentation, and active learning strategies.

  • Motivation and engagement: The act of sharing knowledge and receiving feedback fosters a sense of accomplishment and intrinsic motivation, making learning more enjoyable.

  • Transfer of learning: By explaining concepts to others, learners apply their knowledge in new contexts and situations, enhancing their ability to generalize and apply learning to real-world problems.

  • Collaborative learning environment: Learning by teaching promotes a dynamic and interactive learning environment, where knowledge is shared and exchanged among peers.

Q: How can I apply learning by teaching in my learning?

A: There are many opportunities to apply learning by teaching in various settings and contexts:

  • Tutoring or mentoring: Offer your expertise to tutor or mentor others, explaining concepts and providing guidance to students or colleagues.

  • Online learning platforms: Share your knowledge and insights through online courses, tutorials, or blog posts, reaching a wider audience and deepening your understanding.

  • Creative projects: Develop educational content for presentations, infographics, or interactive learning apps, applying your knowledge to various multimedia formats.

  • Community engagement: Volunteer your time to teach or facilitate workshops or seminars in your community, sharing your expertise and fostering a culture of learning.

Q: What are some examples of learning by teaching in practice?

A: Learning by teaching is widely used in various educational settings and beyond:

  • Traditional classrooms: Peer tutors, study groups, and group projects all incorporate elements of learning by teaching.

  • Online learning platforms: Many online courses and tutorials involve interactive elements where learners explain concepts to each other.

  • Professional development programs: Organizations often use learning-by-teaching strategies to train employees and share best practices.

  • Volunteer organizations: Tutoring programs, mentoring initiatives, and community workshops often employ learning-by-teaching methods.

Q: What are the limitations of learning by teaching?

A: Some potential limitations of learning by teaching include:

  • Self-assessment: Learners may rely too heavily on feedback from others and not adequately assess their understanding.

  • Handling misconceptions: It may be challenging to address and correct misconceptions effectively in a peer-to-peer setting.

  • Managing group dynamics: Maintaining effective communication and collaboration can be challenging in group learning environments.

  • Time commitment: Learning by teaching requires additional time and effort for both the learner and the teaching partners.

It is important to note that these limitations can be addressed through careful planning, effective communication, and ongoing reflection on the learning process.

๐Ÿ˜† JOKES ABOUT LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

- Why did the student fail the learning by teaching test?

Because they taught the wrong material.

- What do you call a student who is good at learning by teaching?

A pro-tutor.

- Why did the teacher turn red during the learning-by-teaching session?

Because their student was explaining a joke that was too funny.

- What do you call a teaching method that is both entertaining and educational?

Learning by laughter.

- Why did the student get a bad grade on the learning by-teaching assignment?

Because their explanation was too confusing.

- What do you call a student who is always teaching their friends?

A knowledge-sharer.

- Why did the teacher give up on learning by teaching?

Because their students were too busy entertaining each other.

- What do you call a student who has taught the same class for years?

A seasoned pro-tutor.

- Why did the student get detention for the learning-by-teaching session?

Because they were too loud.

- What do you call a student who teaches their teacher something new?

A reverse teacher.

- Why did the student’s teacher give them a lollipop after the learning-by-teaching session?

Because they did a great job!

- What do you call a student who is always explaining things to their parents?

A mini-educator.

- Why did the student get a headache after the learning-by-teaching session?

Because they were laughing too hard.

- What do you call a student who teaches their friends how to play video games?

A gamer mentor.

- Why did the student get a promotion after the learning-by-teaching session?

Because they were a natural teacher.

- What do you call a student who teaches their parents how to use technology?

A digital guru.

- What do you call a student who teaches their friends how to bake cookies?

A culinary teacher.

- Why did the student get a raise after the learning-by-teaching session?

Because they were a valuable asset to the team.

- What do you call a student who teaches their friends how to speak another language?

A multilingual maestro.

๐Ÿฆ‹ METAPHORS ABOUT LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

  • Learning by teaching is like polishing a mirror. As you explain a concept to others, you are forced to clarify your thoughts, identify gaps in your knowledge, and refine your understanding. This process is like polishing a mirror, making it clearer and more reflective.

  • Learning by teaching is like sharpening a knife. The act of teaching forces you to organize and articulate your knowledge, making it sharper and easier to grasp. This process is like sharpening a knife, making it more effective and precise.

  • Learning by teaching is like planting a seed. When you explain a concept to others, you are sowing the seeds of understanding in their minds. These seeds can grow into deeper knowledge and appreciation for the subject matter.

  • Learning by teaching is like building a bridge. As you connect concepts and explain them clearly and concisely, you are building a bridge of understanding between you and your learners. This bridge allows for the exchange of ideas and the fostering of knowledge.

  • Learning by teaching is like lighting a candle. When you share your knowledge with others, you are igniting a flame of understanding in their minds. This flame can spread to others, illuminating their paths toward learning.

  • Learning by teaching is like sharing a treasure map. The knowledge you possess is a valuable treasure, and by teaching it to others, you are sharing the map of that treasure with the world. This act of generosity enriches the lives of others and promotes learning.

  • Learning by teaching is like playing a symphony. As you orchestrate your explanations and engage your learners, you are creating a harmonious symphony of learning. This orchestrated learning experience is both enjoyable and enriching.

  • Learning by teaching is like solving a puzzle. When you break down a concept into its constituent parts and explain them clearly, you are like a puzzle master, piecing together the knowledge for others to understand.

  • Learning by teaching is like traveling on a journey. As you explore a subject matter with your learners, you are embarking on a shared journey of discovery. This collaborative learning experience is both educational and stimulating.

  • Learning by teaching is like building a castle. With each brick of knowledge you lay, you are constructing a strong and enduring foundation for understanding. This collaborative learning experience is a testament to the power of knowledge-sharing.

  • Learning by teaching is like navigating a maze. When you guide your learners through complex concepts, you are like a skillful navigator, leading them through the maze of learning. This supportive learning environment fosters a sense of accomplishment.

  • Learning by teaching is like conducting an orchestra. As you orchestrate the flow of information and encourage participation, you are like a conductor, bringing together the diverse voices of learning. This collaborative learning environment is a masterclass in communication and understanding.

  • Learning by teaching is like painting a masterpiece. When you create a vivid and engaging picture of a concept, you are like a painter, bringing the learning experience to life. This creative learning approach sparks imagination and deeper comprehension.

  • Learning by teaching is like weaving a tapestry. As you interweave different concepts and ideas, you are like a weaver, creating a rich and intricate tapestry of knowledge. This collaborative learning experience celebrates the interconnectedness of ideas.

  • Learning by teaching is like cultivating a garden. When you nurture the seeds of understanding in your learners, you are like a gardener, fostering a flourishing garden of learning. This nurturing approach promotes growth and development.

  • Learning by teaching is like building a bridge between generations. As you share your knowledge with others, you are bridging the gap between generations, ensuring that knowledge is passed down and shared for future generations to learn from.

  • Learning by teaching is like lighting a beacon in the darkness. When you share your knowledge with others, you are illuminating the learning path, guiding others toward a brighter future. This act of generosity is a testament to the power of education.

๐Ÿ“š RESOURCES:
#

@book Connirae Andreas; Steve Andreas, 1987; Change Your Mind and Keep the Change: Advanced NLP Submodalities Interventions, ISBN 9780911226294

@book Richard Bandler 1985. Using Your Brain - For a Change: Neuro Linguistics Programming. ISBN-978-0911226270

@book Project Based Teaching: How to Create Rigorous and Engaging Learning Experiences Paperback, 2018, Suzie Boss, John Larmer, ISBN 978-1416626732

@book Teaching for Deeper Learning: Tools to Engage Students in Meaning Making, 2020, Jay McTighe, Harvey F. Silver ISBN 978-1416628620

@book Lakoff, G. and Johnson, M. 2003; โ€œMetaphors We Live By.โ€ Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, ISBN-978-0226468013

๐Ÿง‘โ€๐Ÿฆฒ VLADIMIR KLIMSA EXPERIENCE WITH LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

“The process of teaching forces you to confront your understanding, making it deeper and more nuanced.” - Unknown

  • I have read books, watched videos, attended seminars, and practiced on myself and others. I have learned that explaining things to my younger siblings got more imprint than learning them myself. Building on learning by teaching I have learned to absorb knowledge as a connected sponge. I do recommend that you search for a practitioner who has knowledge, skills, experience, and elegance for your first session.

โœ๏ธ CONCLUSION OF LEARNING BY TEACHING
#

Learning by teaching is a powerful pedagogical approach that promotes knowledge retention, deepens understanding, and develops valuable teaching skills. By actively explaining concepts to others, learners engage in a self-explanation process that reinforces their grasp of the material and fosters a deeper appreciation for the subject. Whether through traditional classroom teaching, online tutorials, or creating educational resources, actively sharing knowledge can significantly contribute to one’s learning journey and positively impact others.

Copyright: ยฉ CC BY-SA 4.0
Citation  Attribution:
Klimsa Vladimir, (Dec 12, 2023), ๐Ÿ‘ฏ EMPOWERING LEARNERS - LEARNING BY TEACHING https://innerknowing.xyz/en/post/20231212-learning-by-teaching/

๐Ÿ—‚๏ธ Representation ๐Ÿ“ Learning ๐Ÿท๏ธ Tools Metaphors

Klimsa Vladimir
Author
Klimsa Vladimir
He is an explorer of the structure of subjective experience, seeking a deeper understanding of how people experience the world through their conscious and subconscious minds. He studies the inner worlds of thoughts, feelings, and sensations that shape our perceptions, behaviors, and choices.
Representation - This article is part of a series.
Part : This Article

Tags #about (1) #author (1) #belief (2) #bio (1) #books (6) #certainty (1) #communication (1) #connection (6) #contact (2) #conviction (1) #disclaimer (1) #featured (5) #hugo (1) #intensify (1) #learning (4) #life-purpose (1) #metaphors (54) #nlp (38) #organisation (1) #pages (2) #perception (1) #practice (4) #privacy (2) #quality (6) #quizzes (3) #sensation (12) #spiritual (1) #ssg (1) #talk (7) #time (3) #tools (48) #voice (6) #zettelkasten (1)

Categories bio (1) books (5) communication (28) contact (2) course (6) events (7) knowledge (2) learning (28) nlp (1) resources (3) sensation (4) site (3) tools (25)

๐Ÿค™๐Ÿป Connect or no by giving your opinion, making requests, suggestions...

Related

๐Ÿซ‚ RELATIONSHIP DYNAMICS - ASSOCIATION & DISSOCIATION
๐Ÿ•™ 27 mins
๐Ÿ•ฅ PSEUDO ORIENTATION IN TIME
๐Ÿ•™ 20 mins
โ˜ฏ๏ธ NLP MODELING - A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE
๐Ÿ•™ 20 mins