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TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, USE YOUR OWN PERSONAL ASSOCIATIONS, VIVID MENTAL IMAGES, MNEMONIC DEVICES, AND REGULAR REPETITION AND REVIEW

๐Ÿ”— HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT
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๐Ÿ”— HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT

๐Ÿ“ Communication ๐Ÿท๏ธ Tools Metaphors NLP
๐Ÿ•™ 30 mins
Vlad | Mentalist | Modeller | Handicapper
Author
Vlad | Mentalist | Modeller | Handicapper
He is an explorer of the structure of subjective experience, seeking a deeper understanding of how people experience the world through their conscious and subconscious minds. He studies the inner worlds of thoughts, feelings, and sensations that shape our perceptions, behaviors, and choices.
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Instruction - This article is part of a series.
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Image credit: Cottonbro Studio

“What we are is the sum of everything we’ve ever said, done and felt, all wrapped up in one unique thread which is constantly being revised and remembered. So to be yourself you have to constantly remember yourself.” - Elizabeth Lamb in Trance, 2013

๐Ÿ“„ ABSTRACT OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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ABSTRACT

Subjective memory techniques are memory strategies that rely on personal associations and experiences to help encode and retrieve information. These techniques can be used to remember anything important, from names and faces to facts and figures.

Some common subjective memory techniques include:

  • Making the information personally meaningful. This can be done by connecting the information to your own experiences, thoughts, and feelings. For example, if you are trying to remember a name, you could associate the person with a friend, family member, or celebrity with the same name.

  • Using imagery. Creating vivid mental images of the information you are trying to remember can help to improve recall. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of items, you could visualize yourself walking through a grocery store and picking up each item on the list.

  • Using mnemonic devices. Mnemonic devices are memory aids that use acronyms, rhymes, or other associations to help you remember information. For example, to remember the planets in order, you could use the mnemonic device “My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas.”

Subjective memory techniques can be used to improve recall in a variety of settings, including school, work, and everyday life. For example, students can use these techniques to remember important concepts and facts, while professionals can use them to remember names, faces, and key information from presentations and meetings.

Overall, subjective memory techniques are a powerful and versatile tool for improving recall. By using these techniques, you can learn to remember anything important, regardless of your learning style or preferences.

We will review

  • Acronyms are words or phrases formed from the first letters of other words or phrases. For example, the acronym ROY G. BIV can be used to remember the colors of the rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet.

  • Chunking is the process of grouping information into smaller, more manageable chunks. For example, you could chunk a phone number into three groups of four digits, making it easier to remember.

  • Imagery involves creating vivid mental images of the information you are trying to remember. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of items, you could visualize yourself walking through a grocery store and picking up each item on the list.

  • Loci is a technique that involves associating information with specific locations. For example, you could imagine placing the items on a list in different rooms of your house.

  • Mnemonics are memory aids that use rhymes, songs, or stories to help you remember information. For example, the following rhyme can be used to remember the order of the planets in our solar system:

  • Pegwords are words or phrases that are easy to remember and can be used to anchor other information. For example, you could use the pegwords “one is a bun” and “two is a shoe” to remember the first two numbers in a list.

THE BENEFITS OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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“I’m not forgetful. I just have a lot on my mind.” - Unknown

THE BENEFITS OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES

Subjective memory techniques are memory strategies that rely on personal associations and experiences to help encode and retrieve information. These techniques can be used to remember anything important, from names and faces to facts and figures.

Here are some of the benefits of using subjective memory techniques:

  • Improved recall. Subjective memory techniques can help you to remember information more accurately and for longer periods of time. This can be beneficial in a variety of settings, including school, work, and everyday life.

  • Increased understanding. By making the information personally meaningful, subjective memory techniques can help you to better understand the information you are trying to remember. This can lead to improved learning outcomes and problem-solving skills.

  • Enhanced creativity. Subjective memory techniques can help you to think more creatively and come up with new ideas. This is because these techniques encourage you to make associations between different pieces of information.

  • Reduced stress and anxiety. When you are able to remember information more easily, you are less likely to feel stressed or anxious about situations where you need to recall information. This can lead to improved performance in school, work, and other areas of your life.

Here are some specific examples of how subjective memory techniques can be used to improve recall in different settings:

  • School: Students can use subjective memory techniques to remember important concepts and facts, as well as to prepare for exams. For example, a student could use the method of loci to visualize themselves placing the steps in a chemical reaction in different rooms of their house.

  • Work: Professionals can use subjective memory techniques to remember names, faces, and key information from presentations and meetings. For example, a salesperson could use the pegword method to remember the first few names of a list of potential customers.

  • Everyday life: Subjective memory techniques can be used to remember everyday things like shopping lists, appointments, and birthdays. For example, a person could use the imagery technique to visualize themselves picking up the items on their shopping list as they walk through the grocery store.

Overall, subjective memory techniques are a powerful and versatile tool for improving recall. By using these techniques, you can learn to remember anything important, regardless of your learning style or preferences.

๐Ÿ›๏ธ ORIGINS AND PRINCIPLES OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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The origins of memory techniques can be traced back to ancient Greece and Rome. The Greek poet Simonides of Ceos is credited with developing the method of loci, a technique that involves associating information with specific locations. This technique is still used today by memory athletes to memorize large amounts of information.

Other early memory techniques include the pegword method, the acronym method, and the rhyming method. These techniques were used by scholars and students to memorize important information, such as religious texts and laws.

During the Renaissance, there was a renewed interest in memory techniques. Scholars such as Giordano Bruno and Giulio Camillo developed new techniques for memorizing information. These techniques were based on the idea that the human mind is like a theater, with different areas for storing different types of information.

In the 19th century, the British psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus conducted a series of experiments on memory. He was the first to scientifically study the effects of repetition and forgetting on memory. His work led to the development of new memory techniques, such as spaced repetition and active recall.

In the 20th century, there was a resurgence of interest in memory techniques, particularly among memory athletes. Memory athletes train themselves to memorize large amounts of information in a short period of time. They use a variety of memory techniques, including the method of loci, the pegword method, and the acronym method.

Today, memory techniques are used by people of all ages and backgrounds. Students use them to improve their grades, professionals use them to boost their productivity, and memory athletes use them to compete in competitions.

Here are some of the most notable figures in the history of memory techniques:

  • Simonides of Ceos (6th century BC): Greek poet who developed the method of loci

  • Giordano Bruno (16th century): Italian philosopher who developed new memory techniques based on the idea of the human mind as a theater

  • Giulio Camillo (16th century): Italian humanist who developed a memory theater, a physical device for storing and retrieving information

  • Hermann Ebbinghaus (19th century): German psychologist who conducted the first scientific studies of memory

  • Harry Lorayne (20th century): American magician and memory expert who popularized memory techniques

  • Dominic O’Brien (20th century): British memory athlete and eight-time World Memory Champion

Memory techniques have a long and rich history, and they continue to be used by people around the world today.

PRINCIPLES OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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The principles of subjective memory techniques are based on the idea that the human mind is better at remembering information that is personally meaningful and associated with strong emotions. Subjective memory techniques rely on personal associations and experiences to help encode and retrieve information.

Here are some of the key principles of subjective memory techniques:

  • Make the information personally meaningful. Connect the information to your own experiences, thoughts, and feelings. For example, if you are trying to remember a name, associate the person with a friend, family member, or celebrity with the same name.

  • Use vivid imagery. Create mental images of the information you are trying to remember. The more vivid and detailed the images, the better. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of items, visualize yourself walking through a grocery store and picking up each item on the list.

  • Use mnemonic devices. Mnemonic devices are memory aids that use acronyms, rhymes, or other associations to help you remember information. For example, to remember the colors of the rainbow, you could use the mnemonic device “ROY G. BIV.”

  • Organize the information. Organize the information in a way that makes sense to you. This could involve grouping the information into categories, creating a timeline, or developing a concept map.

  • Repeat and review. The more you repeat and review the information, the stronger the memory trace will be. So, make sure to revisit the information you are trying to remember regularly.

Subjective memory techniques can be used to remember a variety of information, including names, faces, facts, figures, and lists. They can be especially helpful for remembering information that is difficult to understand or visualize.

Here are some tips for using subjective memory techniques effectively:

  • Be creative and use your imagination. The more unique and memorable your mnemonic devices are, the more likely you are to remember them.

  • Practice regularly. The more you use subjective memory techniques, the better you will become at using them.

  • Apply subjective memory techniques to different types of information. Subjective memory techniques can be used to remember a variety of information, so experiment with different techniques to find what works best for you.

  • Be patient. It takes time to develop and master subjective memory techniques. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t see results immediately. Keep practicing and you will eventually see improvement.

By following these principles and tips, you can learn to use subjective memory techniques to remember anything important.

๐Ÿ—จ๏ธ GUIDING PARTICIPANTS
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  • Sitting by side so you can perceive nuances in facial expression, gestures, coloration of the skin and not stay in the way of client who are accessing their images and creating metaphors in front of them.

  • Modulate your voice and speak slowly and melodically.

  • Be interested and curious about client exploration.

  • Repeat client’s words using his voice delivery. For instance when the client spoke about exciting event, his face lightened up, words speeded up and his tone of voice was higher. As a professional, you are, match his expression or attend acting class to learn essentials.

  • Connect the question and experience with coordinating conjunction and/as/when.

๐Ÿ’ง HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES SCRIPT BASED ON EXPLORATION OF VLADIMIR KLIMSA
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“My memory is like a muscle. The less I use it, the weaker it gets.” - Unknown

Vlad: “Hello, What can I do for you today?”

Client: “I would like to remember more.”

Vlad: “To clarify. When you think about it, you are remembering some things which are important and even some things which aren’t and you are struggling to remember things which you’ve set not to forget. Does it seem as fair description.”

Client: “Yes. I am saying to myself I need to remember this, I need to remember this and than I forget.”

Vlad: “If I were you for one day. What I should be doing in order to remember some things and not others? I would like that you guide me, how to do that.”

Client: “Good. I start thinking if is important for me to retain this information. Normally I just know. Than I go to the future and see myself using this memory in context. I associate and I know that I’ll remember. When I forget it’s because even I consider it important, it slipped away, I didn’t understand it properly, it was to much information, I didn’t see myself using it or I couldn’t associate.”

Vlad: “As I could follow and do everything what you just mention it makes sense. Compare memory ‘It slipped away’ with something which you remember well. And pay attention to submodalities. Point out with your hands location of those two different memories. Notice the size, distance, connection, etc.”

Client: “Good memory is on the right side, lifesize, step away distance and I feel connected as with rope from my navel to myself. Memory which slipped away is on the left, size of post stamp, floating in the space without attachment.”

Vlad: “Put into the exact location of good memory event which you need to remember, make it life size, step away and feel connection between your navel to yourself. Have you got it?”

Client: “Yes.”

Vlad: “Now. Forget it.”

Client: “I can’t forget it.”

Vlad: “Try harder. It can’t be so easy to remember things. Really push yourself.”

Client: “I just can’t forget it. It stuck in my future.”

Vlad: “You have learned that location, size, distance and connection matter. You may expand your your world and learn some more memory techniques such as Peg system, Memory palace, Person - Action - Object, if you so desire.”

Client: “That’s incredible. Thanks very much.”

๐Ÿ‘ฃ THE BASIC PROCESS HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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  1. Elicit structure of experience using submodalities

  2. Elicit differences

  3. Ask for positive intention

  4. Make crossover and integrate positive intention

  5. Use Wholeness process, Core transformation, Trance to get kinesthetic sensation

  6. Observe change

MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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  1. Chunking: Chunking is the process of grouping information into smaller, more manageable units. This makes it easier to remember information because it reduces the amount of information that you have to hold in your mind at once. For example, you can chunk a phone number into three groups of four digits, or you can chunk a list of items by category.

  2. Spaced repetition: Spaced repetition is a learning technique that involves reviewing information at increasingly spaced intervals. This helps to move information from your short-term memory to your long-term memory. You can use spaced repetition by creating flashcards or using a spaced repetition system app.

  3. Visualization: Visualization is a powerful memory technique that involves creating mental images of the information that you are trying to remember. This helps to make the information more concrete and memorable. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of items, you can visualize yourself walking through a store and picking up each item on the list.

  4. Elaboration: Elaboration is the process of connecting new information to what you already know. This helps to make the new information more meaningful and memorable. For example, if you are trying to remember a new vocabulary word, you can try to think of a synonym, antonym, or example sentence for the word.

  5. Mnemonics: Mnemonics are memory devices that help you to remember information by associating it with something else that is easier to remember. For example, you can use acronyms, acrostics, or rhymes to create mnemonics.

PEG MEMORY TECHNIQUE
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The peg technique is a memory technique that uses a list of familiar images (pegs) to help you remember information. It is a simple and effective technique that can be used to memorize a variety of information, such as lists, names, and facts.

To use the peg technique, you first need to create a list of pegs. This list can be anything that you are familiar with, such as the numbers from 1 to 10, the months of the year, or a list of your favorite animals.

Once you have created a list of pegs, you can start to memorize information by associating it with the pegs. For example, if you are trying to memorize a list of items for a grocery store run, you could associate each item with a peg on your list. For example, you could associate the item “milk” with the peg “1,” the item “bread” with the peg “2,” and so on.

To make the associations more memorable, you can create vivid mental images of the item and the peg associated with it. For example, you could imagine yourself drinking a glass of milk while riding on a unicycle (peg 1).

Once you have associated each item with a peg, you can review the list in your mind by going through the list of pegs and visualizing the associated images. This will help you to remember the information in the order that you need it.

Here is an example of how to use the peg technique to memorize a list of items for a grocery store run:

Peg Image Item
1 Unicycle Milk
2 Shoe Bread
3 Tree Eggs
4 Door Butter
5 Hive Honey
6 Sticks Cereal
7 Heaven Coffee
8 Bait Fish
9 Wine Grapes
10 Pen Paper

To remember this list, you would simply visualize the images associated with each peg. For example, you would imagine yourself drinking a glass of milk while riding on a unicycle, eating a slice of bread on a giant shoe, and so on.

The peg technique is a powerful memory technique that can be used to memorize a variety of information. It is a simple and effective technique that can be learned by anyone.

Here are some tips for using the peg technique:

  • Use vivid and memorable images.
  • Associate each item with a different peg.
  • Review the list of pegs and associated images regularly.
  • Practice using the peg technique with different types of information.

The more you practice using the peg technique, the better you will become at using it to memorize information.

LOCI OR PALACE TECHNIQUE
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The loci memory technique, also known as the memory palace technique or the journey method, is a memory technique that uses visualization to help you remember information in order. It works by associating the information you want to remember with a series of familiar locations, called loci. The loci can be any places that you are familiar with, such as your home, your workplace, or your favorite route to walk or drive.

To use the loci memory technique, first choose a series of loci. Then, associate each item of information you want to remember with a specific locus. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of grocery items, you could associate the item “milk” with the front door of your house, the item “bread” with the kitchen table, and so on.

To make the associations more memorable, create vivid mental images of the item and the locus associated with it. For example, you could imagine yourself pouring a glass of milk from a giant carton on your front door, or eating a slice of bread on a giant kitchen table.

Once you have associated each item with a locus, you can review the information in order by simply mentally walking through the series of loci and visualizing the associated images.

The loci memory technique is a powerful tool that can be used to memorize a variety of information, such as lists, names, and facts. It is a simple and effective technique that can be learned by anyone.

Here is an example of how to use the loci memory technique to memorize a list of grocery items:

Locus Image Item
Front door Giant carton of milk Milk
Kitchen table Giant slice of bread Bread
Bathroom sink Giant tube of toothpaste Toothpaste
Bedroom dresser Giant bottle of shampoo Shampoo
Living room couch Giant bag of chips Chips

To remember this list, you would simply mentally walk through your house and visualize the giant images associated with each locus. For example, you would imagine a giant carton of milk on your front door, a giant slice of bread on your kitchen table, and so on.

The loci memory technique is a powerful memory tool that can be used to memorize a variety of information. It is a simple and effective technique that can be learned by anyone.

PAO SYTEM MEMORY TECHNIQUE
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The Person-Action-Object (PAO) memory system technique is a memory technique that uses visualization to help you remember information in order. It works by associating the information you want to remember with a series of people, actions, and objects.

To use the PAO memory system technique, first create a list of people, actions, and objects. The people and actions can be anything you like, but they should be easy to visualize. The objects should be something that you can easily associate with the information you want to remember.

Once you have created a list of people, actions, and objects, associate each item of information you want to remember with a specific person, action, and object. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of grocery items, you could associate the item “milk” with the person “Arnold Schwarzenegger,” the action “drinking,” and the object “a giant milk carton.”

To make the associations more memorable, create vivid mental images of the person, action, and object associated with each item of information. For example, you could imagine Arnold Schwarzenegger drinking a giant milk carton.

Once you have associated each item of information with a person, action, and object, you can review the information in order by simply mentally going through the list of people, actions, and objects and visualizing the associated images.

The PAO memory system technique is a powerful tool that can be used to memorize a variety of information, such as lists, names, and facts. It is a simple and effective technique that can be learned by anyone.

Here is an example of how to use the PAO memory system technique to memorize a list of grocery items:

Person Action Object Item
Arnold Schwarzenegger Drinking Giant milk carton Milk
Chuck Norris Eating Giant loaf of bread Bread
Albert Einstein Shampooing Giant bottle of shampoo Shampoo
Bill Gates Brushing Giant tube of toothpaste Toothpaste
Beyoncรฉ Snacking Giant bag of chips Chips

To remember this list, you would simply mentally go through the list of people, actions, and objects and visualize the associated images. For example, you would imagine Arnold Schwarzenegger drinking a giant milk carton, Chuck Norris eating a giant loaf of bread, and so on.

The PAO memory system technique is a powerful memory tool that can be used to memorize a variety of information. It is a simple and effective technique that can be learned by anyone.

๐Ÿ’ช MEDITATION OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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  • Find a comfortable position to sit or lie down in. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths. Relax your body and mind.

  • Imagine that you are in a safe and peaceful place. This could be a real place that you know, or it could be an imaginary place.

  • Once you feel relaxed and grounded, bring your attention to the information that you want to remember.

  • Use your imagination to create a vivid and memorable image of the information. The more vivid and detailed the image, the better.

  • For example, if you are trying to remember a name, you could imagine the person’s face, their hair color, and the clothes they are - wearing. You could also imagine yourself interacting with the person in some way.

  • If you are trying to remember a fact, you could imagine the fact in action. For example, if you are trying to remember the fact that the - Earth revolves around the Sun, you could imagine yourself standing on the Earth and watching the Sun go around you.

  • Once you have created a vivid and memorable image of the information, repeat the image in your mind several times.

  • Take your time and really savor the image. Pay attention to all of the details.

  • The more you repeat the image in your mind, the stronger the memory trace will be.

  • Once you feel confident that you have remembered the information, open your eyes and return to the present moment.

  • You can use this meditation to remember anything important, from names and faces to facts and figures.

  • Here are some additional tips for using this meditation effectively:

  • Be consistent. Meditate for at least 10 minutes each day.

  • Be creative. Use your imagination to create vivid and memorable images of the information you want to remember.

  • Be patient. It takes time and practice to develop strong memory skills.

With regular practice, you will be able to use this meditation to remember anything important.

โ–ถ๏ธ VIDEO OF HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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โ–ถ๏ธ Youtube - Memory hack: Derren Brown teaches the method of loci | Big Think

โ” FAQ
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Q: What are subjective memory techniques?

A: Subjective memory techniques are memory strategies that rely on personal associations and experiences to help encode and retrieve information. These techniques can be used to remember anything important, from names and faces to facts and figures.

Q: What are some examples of subjective memory techniques?

A: Some examples of subjective memory techniques include:

  • Making the information personally meaningful: Connect the information to your own experiences, thoughts, and feelings. For example, if you are trying to remember a name, associate the person with a friend, family member, or celebrity with the same name.

  • Using imagery: Create mental images of the information you are trying to remember. The more vivid and detailed the images, the better. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of items, visualize yourself walking through a grocery store and picking up each item on the list.

  • Using mnemonic devices: Mnemonic devices are memory aids that use acronyms, rhymes, or other associations to help you remember information. For example, to remember the colors of the rainbow, you could use the mnemonic device “ROY G. BIV.”

  • Organizing the information: Organize the information in a way that makes sense to you. This could involve grouping the information into categories, creating a timeline, or developing a concept map.

  • Repeating and reviewing the information: The more you repeat and review the information, the stronger the memory trace will be. So, make sure to revisit the information you are trying to remember regularly.

Q: What are some tips for using subjective memory techniques effectively?

A: Here are some tips for using subjective memory techniques effectively:

  • Be creative. The more unique and memorable your mnemonic devices are, the more likely you are to remember them.

  • Practice regularly. The more you use subjective memory techniques, the better you will become at using them.

  • Apply subjective memory techniques to different types of information. Subjective memory techniques can be used to remember a variety of information, so experiment with different techniques to find what works best for you.

Q: How can I use subjective memory techniques to remember important information for school or work?

A: Here are some specific tips for using subjective memory techniques to remember important information for school or work:

  • To remember names and faces: Associate the person’s name with a physical feature, such as their hair color or eye color. You could also imagine the person doing something that is relevant to their work or interests.

  • To remember facts and figures: Create mental images of the information. For example, if you are trying to remember the fact that the Earth revolves around the Sun, you could imagine yourself standing on the Earth and watching the Sun go around you.

  • To remember lists: Create a story or song that incorporates the items on the list. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of shopping items, you could imagine yourself going to the grocery store and buying each item on the list.

Q: How long does it take to learn to use subjective memory techniques effectively?

A: It takes time and practice to learn to use subjective memory techniques effectively. However, with regular practice, you will be able to use these techniques to remember anything important.

๐Ÿ˜† JOKES
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Here are 30 funny jokes about memory in relationships:

  • My partner has a memory like a fish. They forget everything, except for the one time I forgot to take out the trash.

  • I’m not sure if my partner has a bad memory or if they’re just trying to avoid doing the dishes.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is made of Swiss cheese. It’s full of holes.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or their refusal to admit that they have a bad memory.

  • I’m starting to think my partner is secretly a goldfish. They have the attention span of a goldfish and the memory of a goldfish.

  • I’m not sure what’s more impressive: my partner’s ability to forget everything or their ability to remember the most insignificant - details.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a black hole. Everything that goes in never comes back out.

  • I’m not sure what’s more annoying: my partner’s bad memory or their habit of making me repeat myself over and over again.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a computer. They can store a lot of information, but they can’t always retrieve it when they need it.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or their tendency to blame me for their mistakes.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a sieve. It lets everything through, except for the important things.

  • I’m not sure what’s more annoying: my partner’s bad memory or their habit of asking me the same questions over and over again.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a fish bowl. It’s small and easy to see through.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or their inability to learn from their mistakes.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a cloud storage service. It’s unreliable and expensive.

  • I’m not sure what’s more annoying: my partner’s bad memory or their habit of making excuses for their forgetfulness.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a used car. It’s not very reliable, but it’s cheap.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or their inability to take responsibility for their actions.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a politician’s promises. They’re empty and meaningless.

  • I’m not sure what’s more annoying: my partner’s bad memory or their habit of making me feel like I’m going crazy.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a dream. It’s fleeting and difficult to understand.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or their inability to see how their forgetfulness affects me.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a conspiracy theory. It’s all over the place and doesn’t make any sense.

  • I’m not sure what’s more annoying: bad memory or their habit of making me feel like I’m the only one who remembers anything.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a magic trick. It’s always disappearing when I need it most.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or their inability to see how their forgetfulness hurts me.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a black hole. It’s always sucking me in and leaving me feeling lost and confused.

  • I’m not sure what’s more annoying: my partner’s bad memory or their habit of making me feel like I’m the one who’s always wrong.

  • I’m starting to think my partner’s memory is like a bad habit. It’s hard to break.

  • I’m not sure what’s more frustrating: my partner’s bad memory or the fact that I still love them.

๐Ÿฆ‹ METAPHORS ABOUT HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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Here are 30 metaphors about memory:

  • Memory is like a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it gets.

  • Memory is like a sieve. It lets the big things through, but keeps the little things in.

  • Memory is like a steel trap. It doesn’t work unless you want it to.

  • Memory is like a computer. It can store a lot of information, but it can’t always retrieve it when you need it.

  • Memory is like a cloud storage service. It’s reliable and accessible from anywhere, but it can be expensive.

  • Memory is like a library. It’s full of information, but it can be difficult to find the book you’re looking for.

  • Memory is like a museum. It’s full of treasures, but it can be overwhelming to see it all.

  • Memory is like a garden. It needs to be nurtured and tended in order to flourish.

  • Memory is like a tapestry. It’s woven from the threads of our experiences.

  • Memory is like a kaleidoscope. It’s constantly changing and shifting.

  • Memory is like a jigsaw puzzle. It’s made up of individual pieces that fit together to form a whole.

  • Memory is like a treasure trove. It’s full of valuable memories that we can cherish forever.

  • Memory is like a labyrinth. It’s easy to get lost in, but it’s also possible to find your way out.

  • Memory is like a river. It’s constantly flowing, carrying us from the past to the present to the future.

  • Memory is like a forest. It’s dense and full of life, but it can also be dark and mysterious.

  • Memory is like a mountain. It’s challenging to climb, but the view from the top is worth it.

  • Memory is like a star. It’s bright and beautiful, but it can also be distant and unattainable.

  • Memory is like a rainbow. It’s full of color and wonder, but it’s also fleeting and ephemeral.

  • Memory is like a dream. It can be vivid and realistic, but it can also be strange and nonsensical.

  • Memory is like a ghost. It’s always there, even when we don’t want it to be.

  • Memory is like a mirror. It reflects back to us who we are and where we’ve been.

  • Memory is like a compass. It helps us to navigate our way through life.

  • Memory is like a bridge. It connects us to our past and our future.

  • Memory is like a window. It allows us to see into the world around us and into the depths of our own souls.

  • Memory is like a tapestry. It’s woven from the threads of our experiences, both good and bad.

  • Memory is like a kaleidoscope. It’s constantly changing and shifting, depending on our perspective.

  • Memory is like a puzzle. It’s made up of individual pieces that fit together to form a complete picture.

  • Memory is like a treasure trove. It’s full of valuable memories that we can cherish forever.

  • Memory is like a labyrinth. It’s easy to get lost in, but it’s also possible to find your way out.

  • Memory is like a river. It’s constantly flowing, carrying us from the past to the present to the future.

๐Ÿ“š RESOURCES:
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@book Joshua Foer, 2012; Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything, ISBN 978-0143120537

@book Ramรณn Campayo Martรญnez, 2009; Desarrolla una mente prodigiosa, ISBN 978-8441421264

@video How To 10X Your Memory & Learning

@web The Wholeness Work

๐Ÿง‘โ€๐Ÿฆฒ VLADIMIR KLIMSA EXPERIENCE WITH HOW TO REMEMBER ANYTHING IMPORTANT, SUBJECTIVE MEMORY TECHNIQUES
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“I’m not losing my mind. I’m just getting more selective about what I keep in it.” - Unknown

  • I have read the books, watch videos, attend seminars, practice on myself and others. I started to learn memory techniques from my father, who got it from his father. Gradually I adopted Person, action, object system as it permitted to retain and access more than 300 pieces of seemingly unrelated events. I got experience over time and I am competent and confident in being able to remember, access and retrieve any important data. I do recommend that you search for practitioner who got knowledge, skills, experience and elegance for your first session.

โœ๏ธ CONCLUSION
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Subjective memory techniques are a powerful tool for remembering anything important. By making the information personally meaningful and using vivid imagery and mnemonic devices, you can create strong and lasting memories.

Here are some key takeaways from this article:

  • Subjective memory techniques rely on personal associations and experiences to help encode and retrieve information.

  • These techniques can be used to remember anything important, from names and faces to facts and figures.

  • Some of the most common subjective memory techniques include:

    • Making the information personally meaningful

    • Using imagery

    • Using mnemonic devices

    • Organizing the information

    • Repeating and reviewing the information

To use subjective memory techniques effectively, it is important to be creative and to experiment with different techniques to find what works best for you. It is also important to practice regularly, as the more you use these techniques, the better you will become at using them.

Subjective memory techniques can be a valuable skill in all areas of life, from school and work to personal relationships and hobbies. By using these techniques, you can learn to remember anything important and expand your knowledge and understanding of the world around you.

๐Ÿ“ Communication ๐Ÿท๏ธ Tools Metaphors NLP

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